NEW ACCOUNT

Individual Account

A standard brokerage account for one person. This general investing account may be used to self-manage a diversified portfolio. This account is also eligible for margin borrowing, options trading after making an additional application. Some services are subject to approval.

Joint Account

A standard brokerage account for one person. This general investing account may be used to self-manage a diversified portfolio. This account is also eligible for margin borrowing, options trading after making an additional application. Some services are subject to app

401(k) or 403(b) 

401(k) or 403(b) offered by your employer. For most people, this is the easiest and best place to start investing for retirement. The money is withheld through payroll deduction, and you can save up to $18,000 of your pretax income in 2015 ($24,000 if you are 50 or older). If you leave your job, you can roll the account over into a new employer’s 401(k) or your own IRA. A 401(k) is usually offered by a for-profit company, while teachers and other employees of nonprofits may be offered a 403(b) instead. Applicants need to submit additional information on it but will have to contact us to complete the process.  Additional forms may be required. 

Individual 401(k)

A sole proprietor can set up an individual 401(k) and make contributions as both the employee and employer, up to a total of $53,000 in 2015 (or $59,000 for someone over 50). Applicants need to submit additional information on it but will have to contact us to complete the process.  Additional forms may be required. 

SEP IRA

SEP stands for simplified employee pension, and this kind of account is used primarily by the self-employed or small business owners. As the employer, you can contribute up to 25 percent of your income or $53,000, whichever is less, in 2015. These accounts are easier to set up than a solo 401(k). If the business has employees, the employer must contribute for all who meet certain requirements.

Simple IRA. This plan allows small employers (fewer than 100 employees) to set up IRAs with less paperwork. Employers must either match employee contributions or make unmatched contributions. An employee can contribute up to $12,500 in 2015, with an extra $3,000 allowed for those over 50.

Applicants need to submit additional information on it but will have to contact us to complete the process.  Additional forms may be required. 

IRA

Anyone can contribute up to $5,500 a year to an IRA ($6,500 if you’re over 50). The money grows tax-free. You can contribute to both an IRA and a 401(k), but if you’re covered by a retirement plan at work, you can’t deduct your IRA contributions from your taxable income if you earn more than $71,000 annually (for single filers) or $118,000 (married filing jointly). After earning $61,000 and $98,000, respectively, you get only a partial deduction. If you’re not covered by a retirement plan at work, you get the full deduction no matter what your income, unless you file jointly with a spouse who has a retirement plan at work.

Applicants need to submit additional information on it but will have to contact us to complete the process.  Additional forms may be required. 

Rollover IRA

A Rollover IRA is a Traditional IRA that is often used by those who have changed jobs or retired and have assets accumulated in their employer-sponsored retirement plan, such as a 401(k).

Eligible distributions from such plans can be rolled over directly into a Fidelity Rollover IRA without incurring any tax penalties and assets remain invested tax-deferred. Consolidating multiple employer-sponsored retirement plan accounts into a single Rollover IRA can make it easier to allocate and monitor your retirement assets.

Applicants need to submit additional information on it but will have to contact us to complete the process.  Additional forms may be required. 

Coverdell IRA

A Coverdell Education Savings Account (also known as an Education Savings Account, a Coverdell ESA, a Coverdell Account, or just an ESA, and formerly known as an education individual retirement account), is a tax-advantaged investment account in the United States designed to encourage savings to cover future education expenses (elementary, secondary, or college), such as tuition, books, uniform, etc. (for the same year as the distribution).

 

Roth IRA

With a Roth IRA, you are contributing after-tax dollars, and you get no tax deduction for your contribution. The money you earn grows tax-free, and you pay no tax on withdrawals after you reach 59 1/2. Plus, unlike with regular IRAs, there is no mandatory withdrawal at age 70, but you can withdraw the amount you contributed (but not your earnings) at any time with no penalty or no taxes due, which is not the case with traditional IRAs. To contribute to a Roth IRA, you must make less than $131,000 (if you’re single) or $193,000 (if you’re married filing jointly). If your income is more than $116,000 (single) or $183,000 (married filing jointly), your allowed contribution is reduced. You can contribute to both a Roth IRA and a traditional IRA, but the limits apply to your total contribution. Some people who make too much to contribute to a Roth IRA contribute to a conventional IRA and convert it into a Roth later.

Applicants need to submit additional information on it but will have to contact us to complete the process.  Additional forms may be required. 

UGMA

The Uniform Gifts to Minors Act (UGMA) is an act in some states of the United States that allows assets such as securities, where the donor has given up all possession and control, to be held in the custodian’s name for the benefit of the minor without an attorney needing to set up a special trust fund. This allows a minor in the United States to have property set aside for the minor’s benefit and may achieve some income tax benefit for the child’s parents. Once the child reaches the age of majority (18 or 21 depending on the state), the assets become the property of the child and the child can use them for any purpose.

UTMA

The Uniform Transfers To Minors Act (UTMA) is a uniform act drafted and recommended by the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws in 1986, and subsequently enacted by most U.S. States, which provides a mechanism under which gifts can be made to a minor without requiring the presence of an appointed guardian for the minor, and which satisfies the Internal Revenue Service requirements for qualifying a gift of up to $14,000 for exclusion from the gift tax.[1] It is a more flexible extension of the Uniform Gifts to Minors Act (UGMA), and allows the gifts to be real estate, inheritances, and other property.

The Act allows the donor of the gift to transfer title to a custodian who will manage and invest the property until the minor reaches a certain age. The age is generally 21 but is different in some states (usually 18 in those cases)

Trust Account (Testamentary)

A testamentary trust is created through the will of a deceased person. Securities are registered in the name of the trust and managed by a trustee. A Trust Account Certification is required to open this account. Applicants need to submit additional information on it but will have to contact us to complete the process.

Trust Account (Family)

A family trust is a trust set up to benefit members of your family.The purpose of the family trust is for you to progressively transfer your assets to the trust so that legally you own no assets yourself, but for you, through the trust, to still have some control over, and get the benefit of, these assets.

Trust Account (Charitable)

Trust Account (Living)

Corporate Account

This is a business account for corporations. Applicants need to submit additional information on it but will have to contact us to complete the process.  Additional forms may be required.

Partnership / Limited Partnership

These are business accounts for partnerships and limited partnerships. Only general partners are allowed to conduct business in a limited partnership account. Applicants need to submit additional information on it but will have to contact us to complete the process.  Additional forms may be required. 

Sole Proprietorship

This is a business account for an individual doing business in his or her own name. Applicants need to submit additional information on it but will have to contact us to complete the process.  Additional forms may be required. 

Limited Liability Company (LLC)

These are business accounts for limited liability corporations. Applicants need to submit additional information on it but will have to contact us to complete the process.  Additional forms may be required. 

Association or Non-Corporate Organization

This is a business account for associations and non-corporate organizations. Applicants need to submit additional information on it but will have to contact us to complete the process.  Additional forms may be required. 

                                                                                  We’re here to help. Feel free to contact us.

Corporation Headquarters

Network 1 Financial Securities, Inc.

2 Bridge Avenue, Suite 241

Red Bank, NJ 07701

Phone:  (732) 758-9001

              (800)-886-7007

Fax:  (732) 758-6671

 

We’re happy to answer any questions you might have about your accounts.

Please call us at (732) 758-9001

                       or  (800)-886-7007.

Have any questions? Send us email to [email protected]

Our back office professional will help you sooner.